Skip to main content
Jerem Liberman's avatar

Jerem Liberman

Young Environmental Stewards Conference - Washington College

Points Total

  • 0 Today
  • 0 This Week
  • 71 Total

Jerem's Actions

Water

5-Minute Showers

I will save up to 20 gallons (75 L) of water each day by taking 5-minute showers.

COMPLETED 0
DAILY ACTIONS

Nature

Explore My Area

I will explore at least one new hiking trail or nature walk in my area.

Uncompleted
One-Time Action

Nature

Do Nature Activities

I will engage in nature-based activities alone, or with my friends or family, for 60 minute(s) each day. (This can be anything from going on a walk or hike, to noticing the leaves changing color, to reading a book with nature themes.)

COMPLETED 0
DAILY ACTIONS

Community

Support Native Communities

I will use the resource links provided below and spend 15 minutes learning about the native populations that lived in my area prior to colonization, and what I can do to support those that still exist.

Uncompleted
One-Time Action

Energy

Power Down the Computer

I will power down my computer and monitor when not using it for more than 2 hours, saving up to (1.1) lbs of CO2 each day that I do this.

COMPLETED 0
DAILY ACTIONS

Health

Happiness

I will write down three things every day that I am grateful for, or send one email every day thanking or praising someone.

COMPLETED 0
DAILY ACTIONS

Food

Watch a Documentary about Food Sovereignty

I will watch 1 documentary(ies) about food sovereignty: the right of local peoples to control their own food systems including markets, ecological resources, food cultures and production methods.

Uncompleted
One-Time Action

Feed

  • Reflection Question
    Energy Power Down the Computer
    What are other easy things you could do to save energy and reduce your environmental footprint?

    Jerem Liberman's avatar
    Jerem Liberman 7/16/2020 5:24 AM
    I could use the comuputer for less time, turn off lights I don't need during the day, and generally just turn off lights when I leave a room.
  • Reflection Question
    Community Support Native Communities
    Indigenous speaker and activist Winona LaDuke says that, "most indigenous ceremonies, if you look to their essence, are about the restoration of balance — they are a reaffirmation of our relationship to creation. That is our intent: to restore, and then to retain balance and honor our part in creation." Why is balance important to sustainability?

    Jerem Liberman's avatar
    Jerem Liberman 7/14/2020 11:06 AM
    Balance is necessary to achieve sustainability, and to grow in ways that maintain our communion with the natural world. Before white settlers reached the midwest, the native americans of the great plains would tend to the open fields by routinely setting controlled fires, which maintained the balance of the ecosystem. It allowed new plants a fresh start and for the plant life to gain additional diversity. Native americans were the first to successfully grow corn, and over generations of agriculture the small grass from which corn descended grew into large stalks laden with sweet, juicy kernels. This created new ecosystems based around corn, and large herbivores and insects adapted to these new environments.
  • Reflection Question
    Nature Do Nature Activities
    What did you observe while spending time outside -- through sight, sound, smell and/or touch?

    Jerem Liberman's avatar
    Jerem Liberman 7/13/2020 4:31 PM
    I went and caught woodland creatures - particularly invertebrates. I learned about what firefly larvae look like, what glowworms are, and found a magnificently enormous great blue skimmer - an exciting find after seeing nothing but ebony jewelwings for weeks. I also observed the sounds of frogs - don't know whether they were green or bullfrogs, but they squeaked and leaped into the water when I got within earshot. I also observed many large annelids that squirmed and slithered across the ground under logs. I noticed a far amount of chlaenius beetles and several narceus americanus under logs as well. I saw and heard the dumetella carolinensis, or catbird, a fair amount of sparrows and robins, carolina wrens, and cardinals.